European symposium series on societal challenges in computational social science

Speakers: Eszter Hargittai (University of Zurich, Switzerland); Kristina Lerman (University of Southern California, USA)

Date: 15 – 17 November 2017

Time: To be confirmed

Venue (15 November): The Alan Turing Institute

Venue (16 – 17 November): The British Library Knowledge Centre

Click here for further details, registration and more.

This conference is co-organized by The Alan Turing Institute, Nokia Bell Labs, GESIS and ETH Zurich, and is sponsored by the Volkswagen foundation.


Computational Social Science (CSS) as an emerging field responds to a situation in which interactions in the digital world generate and shape social structures in a novel way and, in doing so, provide social research with prolific new data sources. As specific forms of “digital society” emerge, CSS sets out to use computation to discover patterns, build models, validate social theories and learn about societies. The emergence of digital societies and the power of algorithmic structuration to massively impact on the allocation of resources and to shape online and offline behavior require adding CSS expertise to the field of inequality research.

This symposium aims at bringing together researchers and practitioners from different disciplines to discuss how the issues of inequality, imbalance, discrimination, and bias in the online as well as offline world can be addressed via computational methods and new kinds of data.

The symposium will last three days and will feature workshops, contributed talks, and keynotes. The event welcomes submissions for workshop proposals (deadline 8 September) and plenary talk proposals (deadline 30 September).

 

Symposium chairs:

Helen Margetts (Oxford Internet Institute, UK)
Luca Maria Aiello (Nokia Bell Labs, UK)

 

Organising committee:

Frank Schweitzer (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
David Garcia (Complexity Science Hub Vienna and Medical University of Vienna, Austria)
Katrin Weller (GESIS, Germany)
Markus Strohmaier  (HumTec Institute and Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany)
Luca Maria Aiello (Nokia Bell Labs, UK)

 

In collaboration with:

 

 

Kindly sponsored by: