Fellow Short Talks – Professsor Andrew Blake and Professor Suzy Moat

Date: 24 November 2016

Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm

Watch the live stream here: bit.ly/TuringLive

Recordings will also be made available on our YouTube channel following the event.

Professor Andrew Blake (The Alan Turing Institute)
Bio
Professor Andrew Blake is Director of The Alan Turing Institute. Prior to joining the institute in 2015, Professor Blake held the position of Microsoft Distinguished Scientist and Laboratory Director of Microsoft Research Cambridge, England. He joined Microsoft in 1999 as a Senior Researcher to found the Computer Vision group. In 2008 he became a Deputy Managing Director at the lab, before assuming the directorship in 2010. Before joining Microsoft Andrew trained in mathematics and electrical engineering in Cambridge England, and studied for a doctorate in Artificial Intelligence in Edinburgh. He was an academic for 18 years, latterly on the faculty at Oxford University, where he was a pioneer in the development of the theory and algorithms that can make it possible for computers to behave as seeing machines.

Professor Blake has published several books including “Visual Reconstruction” with A.Zisserman (MIT press), “Active Vision” with A. Yuille (MIT Press) and “Active Contours” with M. Isard (Springer-Verlag). He has twice won the prize of the European Conference on Computer Vision, with R. Cipolla in 1992 and with M. Isard in 1996, and was awarded the IEEE David Marr Prize (jointly with K. Toyama) in 2001.

In 2006 the Royal Academy of Engineering awarded him its Silver Medal and in 2007 the Institution of Engineering and Technology presented him with the Mountbatten Medal(previously awarded to computer pioneers Maurice Wilkes and Tim Berners-Lee, amongst others.) He was elected Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 1998, Fellow of the IEEE in 2008, and Fellow of the Royal Society in 2005. In 2010, Andrew was elected to the council of the Royal Society. In 2011, he and colleagues at Microsoft Research received the Royal Academy of EngineeringMacRobert Award for their machine learning contribution to Microsoft Kinect human motion-capture. In 2012 Andrew was elected to the board of the EPSRC and also received an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the University of Edinburgh. In 2013 Andrew was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Engineering from the University of Sheffield. In 2014, Andrew gave the prestigious Gibbs lecture at the Joint Mathematics Meetings (transcript available here). Professor Andrew Blake has been named as the recipient of the 2016 BCS Lovelace Medal, the top award in computing in the UK, awarded by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. The award is presented annually to individuals who, in the opinion of BCS, have made a significant contribution to the advancement of Information Systems.

Professor Suzy Moat (Warwick University)
Bio
Suzy Moat is an Associate Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, where she co-directs the Data Science Lab. She is also a Faculty Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute. Her research investigates whether data on our usage of the Internet, from sources such as Google, Twitter, Wikipedia and Flickr can help us measure and predict human behaviour in the real world. The results of her work have been featured by television, radio and press worldwide, by outlets such as CNN, BBC, The Guardian, Wall Street Journal, New Scientist and Wired, and published in journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She has acted as an advisor to government and public bodies on related topics. Moat studied Computer Science at UCL and Psychology at Edinburgh, during which time she won prizes including the UCL Faculty of Engineering Medal.

Research
Our everyday usage of the Internet leaves huge volumes of text and images in its wake. My research draws on these new data sources, and asks: can we use online data to measure human behaviour and experience we couldn’t measure before? Can we generate quicker, cheaper indicators of the wellbeing of society? Can we use these new data sources to predict human behaviour? My previous work has touched on problems as diverse as linking online behaviour to stock market moves (with Preis, Curme, Stanley, et al.), estimating crowd sizes (with Botta and Preis) and evaluating whether the beauty of the environment we live in might affect our health (with Seresinhe and Preis). I am interested in generating indicators to support decision making in a range of domains, including economics and health.

Dr Suzy Moat’s website: www.wbs.ac.uk/about/person/suzy-moat