Introduction

Registration closed.

This workshop will follow the Chatham House Rule.

In 2019 data breaches are predicted to be the most prevalent form of attack against industry. Ransomware along with DDoS attacks, which attack or disrupt data flows, are close behind in the pecking order. Yet, on the other side, the digital data relating to the circumstances of those attacks is vital for identifying what went wrong and analysing how to improve systems so that similar problems do not occur again.

There is a massive challenge to get hold of such data, which would be used to learn how to make systems safer, due to: 

  • Concerns and some misunderstandings about confidentiality, especially post-GDPR. 
  • A general commercial reluctance to announce losses.
  • A heightened level of suspicion following a data breach about how and where their data goes.
  • The additional human and financial resources that participation in research can require of an organisation, particularly after a breach.

It is therefore not surprising that organisations are reluctant to participate in projects and share their experiences and any data that could be invaluable to the research mission.

This climate of distrust is unlikely to change without the establishment of common protocols and shared best practice for the anonymisation and safe sharing of data.

About the event

This collaborative workshop aims to work toward developing protocols and principles for data sharing in research. The workshop will address the following questions:

  1. How can the sharing of data be encouraged? What would ‘good’ look like?
  2. What security requirements should be in place for data sharing? What core principles need to be established and followed?
  3. What is best practice to encourage data sharing? Have we any examples of best practice from other sectors?
  4. How should data be anonymised? How has this been achieved in the success stories of data sharing?

This event is intended to bootstrap a new data security interest group at the center of which is developing the principle of data sharing. We are therefore keen to encourage attendance from all of the key players and sectors in this area, including, but not limited to, organisations, cloud providers, and data scientists.


Registration from 09:30, event starts at 10:00.

Organisers

Budi Arief

Senior Lecturer and Director of Innovation, University of Kent

Dr Thomas Gross

Reader Security, Privacy and Trust. Director of the Centre for Cybercrime and Computer Security, Newcastle University

Location

The Alan Turing Institute

1st floor of the British Library, 96 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DB

51.5297753, -0.12665390000006