About the event

Abstract/Synopsis:   Over the past 150 years, we have built up really good understanding of how individual sub-systems behave. As we connect more and more “things” and “people” together through digital and mechanical technology, we must ask how network topology affects their performance and resilience. This problem is challenging when the size of the network becomes large and run away cascades can cause regional to national scale catastrophes. Here, we offer some initial research into finding the specific relationship between networked dynamics (stability, rate of convergence) and the network topology (eigenvalue, degree). We showcase results for both natural ecosystems and built infrastructures, ranging from water distribution, to transport, to telecommunications. We also point towards methods to reconfigure the topology in a way that stabilises the system, but highlight a regulatory paradox. 

Speaker’s details: Dr Weisi Guo is an associate professor in engineering at the University of Warwick and a Turing Fellow. He graduated with MEng and PhD from the University of Cambridge and works on networks and signal processing for a variety of critical infrastructure and social challenges. He leads the urban analytics special interest group at The Alan Turing Institute. His data-centric engineering research is funded by Lloyd’s Register Foundation via The Alan Turing Institute, EPSRC, InnovateUK, and EC H2020.

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Location

The Alan Turing Institute

1st floor of the British Library, 96 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DB

51.5297753, -0.12665390000006