Turing Lecture: AI through the looking glass

Speaker: Professor Dame Wendy Hall

Date: 28 November 2017

Time: 13:30-16:00

Venue: Knowledge Centre, British Library

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AI through the looking glass

Artificial Intelligence is set to transform society in the coming decades in ways that have long been predicted by science fiction writers but are only now becoming feasible.

While AI is still a long way from being as powerful as the human brain, many machines can now outperform human beings, particularly when it comes to analysing large amounts of data. This will lead to many jobs being replaced by automated processes and machines.

As with all major technological revolutions, such advancements bring with it unexpected opportunities and challenges for society with a need to consider the ethical, accountability and diversity impacts.

In this talk, Wendy Hall will lay out why we need to take a socio-technical approach to every aspect of the evolution of AI in society. She will also consider how the UK might position itself, in light of the AI Review, recently undertaken as part of the UK government’s industrial strategy.

As Alice found when she went through the looking glass, everything is not always what it first appears to be.

Biography

Wendy Hall, DBE, FRS, FREng is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton and was Dean of the Faculty of Physical Science and Engineering from 2010 to 2014. She was Head of the School of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) from 2002 to 2007 and is now a director of the Web Science Institute.

One of the first computer scientists to undertake serious research in multimedia and hypermedia, she has been at its forefront ever since. The influence of her work has been significant in many areas including digital libraries, the development of the Semantic Web, and the emerging research discipline of Web Science.

In addition to playing a prominent role in the development of her subject, she continues to shape science and engineering policy and education. Through her leadership roles on national and international bodies, she has shattered many glass ceilings, readily deploying her position to promote the role of women in science, engineering and technology, and acting as an important role model for others.

She became a Dame Commander of the British Empire in the 2009, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in the same year.

Wendy was elected President of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in July 2008, and was the first person from outside North America to hold this position.