Bio

Torty began her Doctorate at the Turing in September 2019. She is based at the University of Bristol where she also completed her MEng in Computer Science in June 2018. Throughout her degree, Torty became interested in the negative impacts of technology on society, culminating in her master’s thesis, “Towards ethical moral machines”. The thesis, grounded in the autonomous vehicle domain, assesses recent attempts to model human morality and particularly scrutinises the effects of model assumptions on results

Research interests

Torty’s PhD research is in developing explainability frameworks for time series classification in healthcare. She is particularly interested in finding meaningful representations of time series and how these can be used to explain complex model behaviour. Torty is a collaborator on the Menstrual Pain and Period Poverty project spread across the Turing, the University of Bristol and the University of Nottingham which uses transactional data to measure the prevalence of menstrual pain in the UK and the impact of Covid on period poverty.